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Full text of "Pain killer annual : 1871 & 1872"

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j 


^ACE. 

md Household Physician lias 


ERCE 
IANA 






f 




55 


i 


ected favor. We now present 








ition for the ensuing year. 


S Q 


iilii 






minorities upon u Sick Room \ 


LORNE ! 

o/CANA 


yl 






ted, and such receipts have j 


mfi 




us in carrying out our design, 
>nly a guide to health, but a 


.Jpf 11 


^ 

••«• 




)k of reference to those who 


B^vP! 




unfortunate 


ILJy 


5 




[illeu, lias stood the test of 


1Z 


W$m 






universal reputation for sub- j 


1 o 


W\u\ 








hG 


IMff * 


3 




such a wide-spread sale or 


'ff 


„«a 




ion. It is a purely vegetable | 




55 




> even in unskilful hands. 








; is still receiving the most 
(s virtues from persons of the 


« d 




%> 




4? O 






ibility. Physicians of the first 


K U 








3 a most effectual preparation 
may be reached by it and 
















vevy commencement, makes 


it imperative u 


pon every Hk 


msehold to keep the Pain- i 


KlLLEfl 


, always near at hand. 


We 


caution 


all persons to observe that our name 


accompanies th 


e wrapper and label surrounding each 


bottle, 


and the 


words " DAVIS' VEGETABLE PALY- 


KILLER V be blown in the glass. 






Perry Davis & Son. 






CALENDAR FOR 1871 



JANUARY. 


FEBRUARY. 


MARCH. 


S. 

1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


M. 
2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


T. 

3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


W 

4 

11 
18 

25 


T. 

5 
12 

19 

26 


F. 

6 

13 

20 
27 


S. 

7 

14 
21 
28 


S. 

*5 
12 

19 
26 


"6 

13 

20 
27 


T. 

"7 

14 
21 
28 


W 

1 
8 

15 

22 


T. 
2 
9 

16 

23 


F. 

3 

10 

17 
24 


S. 

4 
11 

18 
25 


S. 

"5 
12 
19 
26 


M. 

6 

13 

20 
27 


T. 

1 

14 
21 

23 


W 

1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


T. 
2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


F. 

3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


S. 

4 

11 

18 
25 








APRIL. 


MAY. 


JUNE. 


S. 


M. 


T. 


W 


T. 


F. 


S. 

1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


"7 

H 
21 
28 


1 
15 

29 


T. 
2 
9 

16 

CO: 

3C 


V7 

3 

10 

17 
24 
31 


T. 
4 

11 
IS 

25 


F. 

5 

12 
19 
2G 


S. 

6 
13 

20 
27 


1 
11 
18 

25 


"5 

12 
19 

26 


"g 

13 

20 
27 


W 

*7 

14 
21 

22 


T. 

1 

8 

15 

29 


P. 

2 

9 

1C 

2 c 
SC 


ft 

3 
10 

17 
24 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 

11 
18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
26 


6 
13 

20 
27 


7 

14 
21 
28 
















































JULY. 


AUGUST. 


SEPTEMBER. 


S. 


M. 


T. 


W 


T. 


P. 


S. 

1 
8 

15 

22 
29 


S. 

*6 

13 
20 
27 


M. 

"7 

14 
21 

28 


T. 

1 

8 

15 
22 
29 


W 

2 
9 

16 
23 

30 


T. 

3 

10 
17 

24 
31 


F. 

4 
11 

18 

25 


S. 

5 
12 

19 
26 


S. 


M. 


T. 


W 


T. 


F. 

1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


S. 

2 

9 

16 

23 
30 


2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

11 
18 

25 


5 

12 
19 

26 


6 

13 

20 
27 


7 

14 
21 

28 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 

11 
18 

25 


5 

12 
19 

26 


6 
13 

20 
27 


7 

14 
21 
28 


OCTOBER. 


NOVEMBER. 


DECEMBER. 


S. 

1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


M. 

2 

9 

16 

23 
30 


T. 

3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


W 

4 

11 
18 

25 


T. 

5 

12 
IP 

26 


F. 

6 

13 

20 

27 


S. 

7 

14 
21 
28 


12 
19 
26 


K 

-6 

13 

20 
27 


T. 

"7 
14 
21 
23 


W 

1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


T. 
2 
9 

16 
23 
30 


F. 

3 

10 
17 

24 


S. 

4 

11 
18 

25 


S. 


M. 


-T. 


W 


T. 


F. 

1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


S. 

2 
9 

16 

23 
20 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

11 
18 

25 


5 

12 
19 

26 


6 

13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 

28 



ECIiIPSBS !!«• XOTIL- 

In the year 1871 there will be four Eclipses, two of the Sun, 
and two of the Moon. 

I. A partial Eclipse of the Moon, Jan. 6. Moon rises eclipsed. 
II. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, June 17. Invisible. 

III. A partial Eclipse of the Moon, July 2. Invisible. 

IV. A total Eclipse of the Sun, Dec. 11. Invisible. 



7/ 



SICK ROOM COOKERY. 



"-^-TfaiaJOQQaoor-T- 



There is no subject connected with health deserving of greater 
attention then the food we eat. The healthy and robust may- 
eat with impunity, what others, with less strong digestive 
organs, could not bear. It becomes, therefore, important to 
everybody, to know what kind of food may be eaten without 
injury to themselves, and which will serve to fortify the body 
against disease, instead of paving the way for nature's maladies 
to attack the system. With the sick and bed-ridden (and with 
the young infant deprived of natural food), not only proper food, 
but food properly prepared, is more essential to their health 
than the best medicines ; and yet there is no subject that 
perplexes a kind nurse so much as to know what food to cook 
for the invalids or the baby, aud how to cook it. 

We have, in the following pages, selected for her guidance, 
such receipts and other information as will, we trust, prove a 
great boon to the nurse, and a blessing to the patient. 

What People Injuriously Eat. 

They consume too much carbonaceous food — such as fats, oils, 
butter, lard, sugar, pork, fritters, dough-nuts, greasy griddle 
cakes, pies, and pastry. Carbon dwarfs the soul. It imparts 
an unnatural addition of flesh. It possesses no strength-giving 
power. It obscures the mind, so that we see as "through a 
glass darkly." In many diseases it interferes with the digestion, 
clogging up the system, and hastening destructive disintegration. 



The Annual. 




Wife to Husband. — Charles, I wish, 
when you are in the village to-day, 
that you would step into the Druggist's 
and buy a bottle of the Pain-Killer. 
Be sure and get the genuine, made by 
"Perry Davis & Son." 
Husband. — What on earth do you intend doing with the Pain- 
Killer, my dear? 

Wife. — Freddy caught a severe cold last night, can hardly 
speak, he is so hoarse, and George has had the too hache since 
yesterday morning, and yourself with the Rheumatism. If what 
everybody says can be believed, the Pain-Killer will cure 
these complaints, and such a house as this is we are always in 
trouble, and it would be a perfect God-send if we could find 
something to ease our lesser afflictions. 

Husband. — Well, Mary, anything for a quiet home ; we will 
try the Pain-Killer. 

Husband (returned from the village.) — Mary, here my dear; 
I have just returned from town and brought with me your entire 
list — Tea, Coffee^ Sugar, Calico, and in short a waggonful of — 
Wife (hastily) — And forgot the Pain-Killer? 
Husband. —Oh! no ; couldn't forget that; it's the most prominent 
object in every store in town ; and besides, the fences and stones 
and buildings all have "Pain-Killer" painted or pasted on 
them to remind one of it every minute. The store-keeper says 
that the Pain-Killer should be in every house, and where one 
can put their hand on it in the dark, if need be. 

Wife. — It must be valuable, else the Parson's wife wouldn't 
praise it to the skies as she does. 

Husband. — And what does the Parson's wife say about it ? 
Wife.^AVhy, it does everything but impossibilities ; she cures 
Sore Throat, Canker Rash, Croup, Coughs, Colds, Bowel 
Complaints, Cramps, Neuralgia, Rhuematism ; in fact, she is a 
host of Doctors all in herself, if she has a bottle of Pain-Killer 
with her. 

Husband. — She needs to be ; I never saw such children as 
hers are, they are always cutting their fingers, spraining their 
ankles, and falling down stairs. 

Wife. — Yes, and the Pain-Killer is magical when used for 
Sprains, Bruises and Fresh Cuts. That reminds 



'KQTb 09 



Side Room Cookery. 



We give below a table of the results obtained by Dr. Beaumont, 
not as a mere matter of curiosity, but as furnishing information 
of the most valuable kind in connection with animal nutrition. 
The first column indicates the substance taken into the stomach, 
the last, the time required for its digestion : — 



Boiled Rice 

Sago, Tapioca, Barley and 

Boiled Milk 

Tripe and Pigs' Feet 

Fowls, Beef's Liver 

Hard Eggs 

Soft Eggs 

Custard 

Trout, boiled or fried 

Other fresh Fish 

Beef, rare roasted 

Beef, dry roasted 

Salt Beef, with Mustard 

Pickled Pork 

Fresh Pork 



H.M. 

1.00 

2.15 
1.00 
2.30 
3.30 
3.00 
2.15 
1.30 
3.00 
3.00 
3.30 
2.30 
4.30 
3.00 



Mutton, fresh. 

Veal 

Wheat Bread, fresh baked. . 

Corn Bread. 

Sponge Cake 

Succotash 

Apple Dumpling 

Apples, sour and mellow.. . . 
Apples, sweet andmellow. . ■ 

Parsnips, boiled 

Potatoes, boiled 

Potatoes, roasted 

Raw Cabbage 

Raw Cabbage, with Vinegar. 
Cabbage, boiled 



H.M. 

3.15 
4.00 
3.30 
3.15 
2.30 
3.4^ 
3.00 
2.00 
1.30 
2.30 
3.30 
2.30 
2.30 
2.00 
4.30 



Coffee and Tea. 

Coffee may be used with benefit by laboring men; but black 
tea is the best drink for sedentary persons. 

Smoking. 

In Consumption, Catarrh, and Nervous Exaltation of the 
system, moderate smoking is always beneficial. 

Health Aphorisms. 

I. — Rise early, and take a good walk or ride before breakfast. 

II. — Do not eat breakfast immediately on rising. The stomach 
is not in a condition to receive food. 

III. — There is a great virtue in fasting early in the day, and at 
evening. 

IV. — Let the breakfast and the supper be light — reserving 
strong food, as meat, etc., for the middle of the day. 

V. — A good rule would be : rise at 7 — breakfast at 8 or £ — 
dinner at 1 — a light tea at 6. 

VI. — Eat slowly, masticate thoroughly, and drink in sips. 
Very little fluid during meals. Liquids should be taken an hour 
after meals — then they assist digestion. 



The Annual, 



his finger awfully this morning; I will hasten and put some 
Pain-Killer on it. 

Husband. — You have great faith, Mary, in the Pain-Killer. 
The Parson's wife and Mrs. Judge Jones are very positive in 
favor of it ; but I am inclined to think that if did all it professes 
to do sickness and death would soon be out of fashion, for it 
cures everything. 

Wife. — The Parson's wife and Mrs. Judge Jones are not the 
only ones that I have heard strongly recommend the Pain- 
Killer ; everywhere 1 go they have it and everybody praises it ; 
all the Liniments, Cholera Mixtures and Pain Medicines have 
disappeared since Perry Davis' agent came round. (To little boy) 
George, does your tooth still ache, my dear! 

George. — No, Mother, Pain-Killer stopped it. 

^T^j?jj||. Wife to Husband. — The Pain-Killer does 

T jet " ^"i^vix jl not P rofess to cure everything, either in 

U^,,, [iiiii^t; ._ ' tne Directions about the bottle or in the 

^ ^^^@t4^^^^ "Annual" ; I have read them carefully. It 

jl!|g|g^|jfl ^g|~ '"pg l n l claims to be the best Family Medicine in 

^ existence. Perry Davis & Son do not say 

Xj&*~/~~f y^r^l w ^ at ^ can do, but prove what it has done 

^MBiiiifrfstj 1 ^' ky gi y i n g certificates from reliable persons, 

^•^^^fiHHin^ whose testimony cannot be doubted. 

Husband.— Do you think these certificates are bona fide ; I 
believe they are made up to sell the goods. 

Wife. — Judge Jones was as incredulous as you till he wrote 
to Perry Davis & Son and was satisfied ; they sent him a quire 
of certificates, received from parties within five miles of his own 
house. 

Husband. — What do these certificates amount to ? 

Wife. — They prove that Perry Davis' Pain-Killer is safe to 
use under any circumstances ; that it is not only a Liniment to 
rub on Bruises, Cuts, Scalds, Burns and external complaints, 
with unfailing relief, but that it has done miracles in curing 
Colic, Cramps, Spasms, Heartburn, Diarrhoea, Dysentery, Sour 
Stomach, Dyspepsia, Sick Headache, and also it was the Pain- 
Killer that cured John Sparkler of the Fever and Ague ; you 
know he had it for over a year. 

Husband. — Did it cure any Rheumatism about here ; I am 
more interested in that than I am in fever and ague. 



BROTHS AND MEAT TEAS. 



Mutton Broth. 

Take the scrag end of a neck of mutton, chop it into small 
pieces, put it into a saucepan filled with water, and set it over a 
fire. When the scum begins to rise, skim it off, add a little 
nutmeg, French barley, or a crust of bread to thicken it ; boil 
the mutton till it will shake to pieces, then strain your broth 
through a hair sieve, skim off the fat, and send it up with dry 
toast. 



Chicken Broth. 

Skin a small chicken and split it in two parts, boil one half 
in three half-pints of water, with a blade or two of mace (or a 
little nutmeg), a small crust of white bread ; boil it over a slow 
fire, till it is reduced to half the quantity ; pour it into a basin, 
and take off the fat, and send it up with a dry toast. 

All Meat Broths are made in the same manner. « 



A. Andrews, of the Bruce Reporter (Kincardine) says : " I think 
very highly of the Pain-Killer as an excellent remedy, and have 
no hesitation in strongly recommending it." 



Extract of Meat. 



Cut lean juicy beef or mutton in small bits, fill a quart bottle 
three-fourths full. Cork and wire tightly, and put the bottle in 
a kettle of cold water ; let it boil gently one hour ; when it is 
removed, press the meat to obtain the juice which may yet 
remain in the meat. 



A VERY NICE PAIR. 

Two magpies sat on a garden rail, 

As it might be Wednesday week ; 
And one little magpie wagged his tail 

In the other little magpie's beak. 

And doubling, like a fist, his little claw-hand, 

Said this other, " Upon my word, 
This is more than flesh and blood can stand, 

Of magpie or any other bird." 

So they pecked and they scratched each other's little eyes, 

Till all that was left on the rail 
Was the beak of one of the little magpies, 

And the other little magpie's tail. 



The Annual, 



Wife. — You had better go over to Judge Jones and see the 
certificates for yourself; there is no question but what they are 
convincing, and I don't think he has returned them yet to 
Providence, R. I., where Perry Davis & Son's head office is. 

Husband. — I am really getting interested in the Pain-Killer, 
my dear, and I will call on the Judge to-day, for my*Rheumatism 
is quite unbearable. 

Husband (returned from a call on Judge Jones). — Well,Mary, 
I have examined those certificates and found them straight as a 
string; there are so many imitations and counterfeits sticking, 
like barnacles, to every good medicine, that I have learned to 
look upon the good and bad as one and alike. It is very wrong, 
however; this Pain-Killer of Perry Davis has stood the test of 
time. Doctors and Druggists have not been able to hush it up ; 
it's as you say, Mary, in everybody's house, and I am astonished 
to find it has been doing such a world of good about here, and 
we have known nothing about it. 

Wife. — It must have cured somebody's Rheumatism or you 
would'nt have been converted so easily. 




Husband. — Converted ! Why it lias cured a dozen of (jases 
about here within a year : Simon Tinkler, who, you know, used to 
be such an awful sufferer with it and was laid up half the time — 
why it was this same Perry Davis' Pain-Killer that cured him. 
George Trotter, who Doctor Squills used to pity so much and 
call such a great sufferer, he, too, was cured with the P ain-Killer, 
and what's more, he writes that he paid Doctor Squills over one 
hundred Dollars for attending him and was growing worse all 
the while ; here, my dear, rub some of it on my shoulder at once. 
I am through with Doctor Squills ; if Pain-Killer can't cure 
me, nothing will — I am convinced of that. 

Wife to Husband — (Rubbing the Pain-Killer on his Rheumatic 
shoulder briskly) — Its a great pity such a good medicine as 



SlcJc Room Cookery, 



Real Extract of Beef, No. 2. 

Have ready a bright bed of ccal, rub a thick juicy steak with 
a very little salt; broil quickly, and press out all the juice as it 
gathers ; it may be made boiling hot or used as it leaves the beef. 
If used without cooking, however, it will be more strenghtening 
than if changed by heat. 

Chicken Tea. 

Cut the meat from the bones, put it in a bottle with a little 
water ; cork and wire the bottle and put it in cold water and boil 
one hour. 



Sage Tea. 

Dried leaves of sage, half an ounce ; boiling water, one quart. 
Infuse for half an hour, and strain, add sugar and lemon juice as 
required by the patient. Balm and other herb teas are made in 
the same manner. 

The above infusions form agreeable drinks in fevers. 



Malt Tea. 

To one pint of ground malt add three pints of scalding water; 
that is, water not quite brought to the boiling point ; infuse two 
hours and strain ; add sugar, and flavor to suit the taste. An 
excellent preparation in inflammatory fevers. 

The following ode is by "one of the good old stock" : — 

" That seat is engaged," said a pretty young maid, 

As I entered a carriage one day ; 
" To whom ? " " A young gentleman," pouting, she said. 

" Then where is his baggage, I pray?" 
Her ruby lips opened, like rosebuds in spring, 

Her face in deep blushes was dyed, 
As muttering crossly " You hateful old thing ! 

Why, I am his baggage," she cried. 



Herb and Root Teas. 

All herb and root teas should be made with the same care as 
green tea. Steep them in earthenware teapots, tightly closed, 
and use them while fresh ; the infusions loose life by long steeping 
and exposure to air. Strain the tea before serving. 

Beef Tea. 

Lean beef, cut into shreds, one pound ; water, one quart. Boil 
for twenty minutes, taking off the scum as it rises. When it 
grows cold, strain. 



The Annual. 



Perry Davis' Pain-Killer is not more extensively used ; just see 
what a world of good it has done even since we have had it. 
George don't have the toothache any more ; it has saved Freddy 
a severe attack of Fever ; it has cured me of Dyspepsia, and I 
know it will relieve you of Rheumatism. 

Husband. — You are right, Mary, the Pain-Killer seems to fire 
up the cold corners of my shoulder and put new life into it ; it 
certainly does act instantaneously. I do think, my dear, I am 
cured already. (Meditatingly.) Well, well, all I have heard said of 
it is true ; my shoulder is free from pain the first time for these 
two months. 

Wife. — It is strange we never have been induced to try it 
before; I should have thought you would have been often 
advised to try it. 

Husband. — I have had the Pain-Killer recommended many 
times ; but between the Doctors and Druggists, they have always 
succeeded in keeping me from using it, by suggesting other trash 
that has done me no good. 

Wife. — People seem to enjoy paying the Doctor five to ten 
Dollars every now and then to experiment on them, when a 
twenty-five cent bottle of Pain-Killer would give them far 
more relief ; and then the Druggists are so obliging, it is very 
hard to say "I want Perry Davis' Pain-Killer, and nothing else 
will do," and thus refuse to buy their trash. 

Husband. — I shall know them better hereafter. Druggists and 
Storekeepers are doing not only themselves a great deal of 
harm, but their customers also, by inducing them to buy an 
article unknown and without merit. Perry Davis' Pain-Killer 
has been before the public for over thirty years : it is known in 
every quarter ot the earth, and is sold by every Druggist and 
most storekeepers and grocers. As a Cholera specific and 
Diarrhoea medicine, its reputation has no parallel. I am surprised 
that we have lived so many years without it. 

Wife. — Charles, the reason is you have been taking whatever 
the storekeeper would recommend; we have always had a bottle 
of Pain Cure or Reliever or Pain Remedy, or some such trash in 
the house ; we have tried them over and over again. 

Husband. — And that is just the reason I objected to try the 
Pain-Killer on my Rheumatism ; I thought it was like those 
other things — a humbug. 



SicJc Koom Cookery. 



GRUELS. 

Incfian Meal Gruel. 

Put into a spider one quart of cold water ; stir in a teacup of 
cold water a large table spoonful of sweet Indian meal, stir this 
in the water; add a little salt, and boil it gently fifteen minutes, 
stirring constantly for five minutes. It can be enriched by a 
spoonful of sweet cream, sweetened or spiced to suit. For a 
convalescent boil raisins in the gruel, add sugar, nutmeg and a 
little butter — break into the gruel a nice cracker or toasted 
bread. 



Oatmeal Gruel. 

Take one spoonful of oatmeal, boil it in three pints of water 
till it is fine and. smooth, then take it off the fire and let it stand 
and settle, then pour it into a bowl, and add white wine, sugar 
and nutmeg to your taste ; serve it up hot with buttered toast on 
a plate. 

Flour Gruel. 

Tie a teacup of flour in a strong cloth and boil it six hours ; 
when it is done it will be a hard cake of flour ; dry it and grate a 
large table spoonful, mix it in paste with cold water and stir it in 
boiled milk ; let the gruel boil gently for ten minutes and add 
salt. This is excellent for patients suffering with bowel 
complaints. 

Arrowroot Gruel. 

Arrowroot one table spoonful ; sweet milk half a pint ; boiling 
water half a pint — to be sweetened with loaf sugar. Excellent 
diet for children when the bowels are irritable. 



Sago Gruel. 

Sago two teaspoonfuls ; water one pint ; boil gently until it 
thickens, frequently stirring. Wine, sugar, and nutmeg may be 
added, according to circumstances. 

Barley Gruel. 

Boil pearl barley till tender — reduce it to a pulp — pass it through 
a seive ; add water until of the right consistence ; boil fifteen 
minutes, and season to suit the taste. 



Caudle. 

Make a smooth thick gruel with groats or Indian meal, stir it 
while cooling, and add nutmeg sugar and wine to suit the taste. 



The Annual. 



Wife.— I wish I could but speak to every mother in America, 
especially those who live in the country places, or far from a 
good Physician. I would (like the Parson's wife) insist on their 
buying a bottle of Perry Davis' Pain-Killer. If they could not 
afford to buy, I wish I could present them with a bottle ; but 
few, very fcw indeed, but could find a quarter of a Dollar to buy 
it if they culy knew the benefits and comfort it would afford 
them. 

Husband— "For children the Pain-Killer is invaluable. Aches 
and pains arc as nothing with them, if they have the Pain- 
killer at htnd — it acts so quickly. For you it has been 
invaluable ; inured you of Dyspepsia, and for me I cannot express 
my thankfulnes since my terrible Rheumatism has left me. 

Wife. — I mui be sure and tell the Parson's wife what a 
blessing this P^n-Killer has proved, and what a good work 
she is doing in teling its merits everywhere she goes. 



For the Sick Room. 

The following recoe makes a delicious refreshing wash in the 
sick room, and cools he aching head : 

Take of rosemary, v>rmwood, lavender, rue, sage, and mint, a 
large handful of each. Place in a stone jar, and turn over it 
one gallon of strong cio r _ v inegar, cover closely, and keep near 
the fire for four days, thi strain, and add one ounce of pounded 
camphor-gum. Bottle &i keep tightly corked. 

There is a French le^id connected with this preparation, 
(called vinaigre d, quat voleurs). During the plague at 
Marseilles, a band of robb. a plundered the dying and the dead, 
without injury to themselvi. They were imprisoned, tried, and 
condemned to die, but were a rdoned on condition of disclosing 
the secret whereby they con ransack houses infected with the 
terrible scourge. They gave^ e above recipe. 

Another mode of using it i&o wash the face and hands with 
it before exposing one's self tc,ny infection. 

It is very aromatic and refining in the sick-room ; so, if it 
can accomplish nothing moreu is of great value to house- 
keepers. 



Sick Moom Cookery. 



Water Gruel. 

Take one spoonful of oatmeal or corn meal, boil it in three 
pints of water, till it is fine and smooth, then take it off the fire 
and let it stand and settle, then pour it into a bowl, and add 
white wine, sugar, and nutmeg, to your taste ; serve ii up hot, 
with buttered toast upon a plate. 



Rice Gruel. 

Ground rice one heaping teaspoonful, ground chnamon one 
teaspoonful, water one quart. Boil gently for twmty minutes, 
adding the cinnamon near the conclusion. Strain and sweeten. 
Wine may be added in some cases. 



Why is a hog a good mathematician ? — Because he is good on 
a " square root. " 



/ 



Rice Milk. 

Take a teacupful of rice, pick and wash wel/and put it down 
to boil with water; when sufficiently cooked <dd three pints of 
milk, sweeten to your taste, and put in some/vhole cinnamon ; 
let it boil about ten minutes ; then stir in threfeggs well beaten ; 
stir until well thickened — then serve. This S an excellent dish 
to use in DIARRHCEA and DYSENTERY. 



Sago Milk. 

Wash a table spoonful of sago ; put it in* a quart of new milk ; 
stir until it is has boiled, then let it simtfr until reduced one- 
half, and season to suit the taste. 



Ground Rice M*k. 

Take a dessert spoonful of rice flou mix in a smooth paste 
with cold milk ; boil one quart ; stir in tf paste ; boil five minutes 
and season to suit the taste. 

The Pain-Killer is not in any s/se a " cure-all;" we only 
claim for it the very best position hong the prominent and 
valuable household remedies. W/ believe a judicious diet, 
careful treatment, and avoidance exposure, are as important 
as a good medicine. Indeed, th^est of medicines must fall 
if these points are neglected. 

We have long used the Pai£ ill er in our families and 
recommended it to our friends, a/ it has never deceived us, nor 
failed to meet our most sanguinekpectations. 



A DOZEN REASONS 




Best Family Medicine of this Age 

And why it should be kept always near at hand : — 

1st. Pain-Killer is the most certain Cholera cure that medical 

science has produced. 
2nd. Pain-Killer, as a Diarrhoea and Dysentery remedy, is 

unequalled. It seldom if ever fails. 
3rd. Pain-Killer will cure Cramps or Pains in any part of the 

system. A single dose usually effects a cure. 
4th. Pain-Ktiier will cure Dyspepsia and Indigestion, if used 

according to directions. 
5th. Patn-Kiiler is an almost never-failing cure for Sudden 

Colds, Coughs, &c. 
6th. Patn-Killer has proved itself a Sovereign Remedy for 
Fever and Ague, and Chill Fever : it has cured the most 
obstinate cases. 
7th. Pain-Killer as a liniment is unequalled. For Frost 
Bites, Chilblains, Burns, Bruises, Cuts, Sprains, &c, no 
Physician can do more than it. 
8th. Pain-Killer has cured cases of Rheumatism and Neuralgia 

after years stand, r . 
9th. Pain-Killer win destroy Boils, Felons, Whitlows, Old 
Sores and Swelled Joints, giving relief from Pain after 
the first application. 
10th. Pain-Killer cures Headache, Toothache, and Neuralgic 

Pains in any part of the body. 
11th. Pain-Killer will save you days of sickness, and many a 

Dollar in time, and Doctors' Bills. 
12th. Pain-Killer is a purely Vegetable preparation, safe to 
keep and to use in every family. The simplicity attending its use, 
together with the great variety of diseases that may be entirely 
eradicated by it, and the great amount of pain and suffering 
that can be alleviated through its use, makes it imperative upon 
every person to supply themselves with this valuable remedy, 
and to keep it always near at hand. 

The Pain-Killer is now known and appreciated in every 
quarter of the Globe. Physicians recommend it in their practice, 
while all classes of society have found in it relief and comfort, 



Side Room Cookery. 



Coffee Milk. 

Boil a dessert spoonful of ground coffee in nearly a pint of 
milk, for a quarter of an hour ; then put into it a shaving of 
isinglass and clear it. Let it boil a few minutes and set it 
beside the fire to clarify ; sweeten with loaf sugar. 



Barley Milk. 

Boil pearl barley in milk until it becomes as thick as thin 
cream flavor ; to suit. 



SOUPS. 

Physicians do not now consider soups as nourishing as 
formerly. Teas made from meats are much more so ; and nothing 
in the form of food can be found more stimulating than the Extract 
of Beef, when properly prepared in the form of Tea. (See receipt.) 



Neudle Soup. 

Six eggs well beaten ; a teaspoonful of salt and flour to make 
a paste to roll. Roll it as thin as paper; fold it and shred it 
fine. Boil it in a gallon of any meat broth, and season with salt 
and pepper. For an invalid boil it in milk and water, slightly 
thickened if desired. 



Chicken Soup. 

Cut up the fowl, cut each joint, and let it boil one hour, then 
stir in powdered crackers, pepper, and salt, to season ; let it boil 
up fifteen minutes, and serve. 



Vegetable Soup. 

Take one turnip, one potatoe, and one onion, let them be 
sliced and boiled in one quart of water for an hour; add as much 
salt as is agreeable, and pour the whole upon a slice cf dry 
toast. This forms an agreeable substitute for animal food, and 
may be given when the latter is inadmissible. 



Caution. — Never enter a sick-room in a state of perspiration, 
as the moment you become cool the pores absorb. Do not 
approach contagious diseases with an empty stomach, nor sit 
between the sick and the fire, because the heat attracts poisonous 
vapors. 



ALLEN'S UJm BALSAM 




FOB THE CUBE OF CONSUMPTION 

and all diseases that lead to it, such as COUGHS, NEGLECTED 
COLDS, BRONCHITIS, PAIN in the CHEST and Diseases of 
the LUNGS and THROAT, Alien?* Lung Balaam, is unequalled 
and has established for itself a 

WORLD-WIDE REPUTATION. 

Physicians recommend it in their practice, rnci the formula 
from which it is prepared is highly commended by Medical 
Journals. The Clergy and the press have complimented it in 
the most glowing terms, and it stands the very first among the 
popular Cough Remedies of the age. 

ftfg§*' Caution. — As there are numerous Cough mixtures sold 
under appellation of Cough Balsam, Specifics, &c, intending 
purchasers will be careful and not be deceived; procure only 
ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM ; remember that the genuine has 
the signature of J. N. Harris & Co. on the outside wrapper, and 
"ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM" is blown in the glass. 

Sold by all Druggists and Dealers in Family Medicines. 



Sick Room Cookery. 



DRINKS FOR INVALIDS. 



Barley or Corn Coffee. 

Get common barley, wash it in several waters ; dry and brown 
it without burning. Grind the barley, mix it with egg, and pour 
over it boiling water ; let it boil a few moments and strain it 
clear. Season as the patient likes. This is excellent drink for 
persons troubled with bowel complaints. Corn coffee is made in 
the same manner, and is used to settle the stomach. 



j Crust Coffee. 

Toast slowly one or two slices of brown or white bread, pour 
boiling water over it, sweeten to suit the taste and drink hot or 
cold, according to preference. 

Suet Ptisan. 

Sheep suet two ounces, milk one pint, starch half an ounce, 
boil slowly for half an hour. This may be used as a common 
drink in Dysentery. 

g^^The popularity of the Pain-Killer has induced others to 
imitate it to a great extent. Purchasers should be careful and 
buy none but the genuine. 

An Irishman put his head into a lawyer's office, and asked the 
inmate, " An' what do you sell here?" "Blockheads," replied 
the limb of the law. " Och, thin, to be sure," said Pat, " it must 
be a good trade, for ye have but one of them left." 

A Missouri farmer being asked if raising hemp was a good 
business, answered, " I can't sartin say ; but it is surely better 
than being raised by it." 

Lemonade. 

Fresh lemon juice about four ounces, thin lemon peel half an 
ounce, white sugar four ounces, boiling water three pints. Let 
them stand till cold and strain. When used in fevers, a little 
spirits of nitre may be added. It may be further diluted to suit 
the taste of the patient. 



The New York Examiner says : — Every mother and house- 
keeper must often act as a physician in the many illnesses and 
accidents that occur among children and servants. For many 
of these cases, I have used Davis' Pain-Killer, and consider it an 
indispensable article in the medicine box. In Diarrhoea, it has 
been used and effected cures. For cuts and bruises it is 
invaluable. 



cota-STTniFTiosr: 

Cough and Lie Remedy, for Families to fceep at band : 

ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM. 



It sells everywhere and gives satisfaction. Read the 
following : 

Port Burwell, Ont., March 23rd, 1869. 

Gents, — I am pleased to notify you of the benefit which I 
have received from your Allen's Lung Balsam. Having been 
troubled with an occasional cough, at times very severe, during 
years past, I have found your Balsam to relieve my cough more 
readily than anything I ever tried. My wife has also used it 
with most satisfactory results. 

Yours truly, 

Capt. D. FOSTER. 



West Farnham, Que., Jan. 21, 1871. 

Messrs. Perry Davis & Son, 

Gents, — I have had a bad cough for several years past, and 
every time I took a little cold, my cough increased. I had 
consulted several Physicians without obtaining from them 
anything to relieve me. I, at last, was induced to try Allen's 
Lung Balsam by one of your agents, which I found to help me. 
I continued its use until I was entirely cured. I can safely 
recemmend the Lung Balsam as a valuable family medicine, and 
one every family should keep at hand. 

Your respectfully, 

E. H. RIPLEY. 



MOTHERS, — Have you delicate, weakly children, who are 
always taking cold, and subject to Croup? Remember, there 
never was a case of Croup which did not originate in a Cold ! 
And when your child goes to bed, wheezing and coughing, you 
know not that, before morning, Croup may not set in, and ere 
you can get a physician, your dear child may be beyond the 
reach of help. "We beseech you, therefore, as you value the lives 
of your children, keep Allen's Lung Balsam by you in the 
house. Let every Mother, especially, heed well these remarks, 
that she may not hereafter, when mourning over the early blight 
of some cherished blossom, have occasion bitterly to reproach 
herself for her criminal neglect. It is an old adage, that "to be 
forewarned is to be forearmed. " Parents, so let it be in your 
case. 



Sick Room Cookery, 



Apple Water. 

Cut two large apples in slices, and pour a quart of boiling 
water on them. Or pour the same amount of water on roasted 
apples. In two or three hours strain and sweeten, also add 
grated nutmeg. 

Barley Water. 

To make good barley water choose the best pearl barley, boil 
it for a few minutes, then throw away the water, and add fresh, 
in the proportion of a pint to an ounce of barley. Boil quickly 
in a tin or earthen vessel, and then let it simmer for an hour ; 
strain and sweeten ; flavor with lemon, or according to taste. It 
is a very mucilaginous drink, and beneficial to invalids. 



Barley Negus. 

One pint of barley water, half a pint of wine, a tablespoonful 
of lemon juice, nutmeg, and sugar to suit the taste. 



Read the following : 

Worthington, Ohio, May 22nd 1866. 

Dear Sir: — I bear willing testimony to the sterling merits of 
Allen's Lung Balsam for all Pulmonary troubles. I had a very 
distressing cough, and the Balsam gave me immediate relief and 
permanent benefit. I have had a severe attack of Pleurisy and 
by its aid was relieved and cured. I am satisfied that all that 
is necessary to convince any one of its merits, would only be to 
make a trial of it, and I cheerfully recommend it to all whose 
condition demands anything of this nature, asking for it an 
impartial trial, and believing they will, and hoping they may 
be benefitted as much as I was myself, 

I am respectfully, &c, 

S. R. TAYLOR. 



Bice Water. 

Rice two ounces, water two quarts, boil an hour and a half in 
a tin or earthen vessel, and add sugar and nutmeg. Rice, when 
boiled for a considerable length of time, becomes a kind of jelly, 
and mixed with milk is a very excellent diet for children. It 
has in some measure a constipating property, which may be 
increased by boiling the milk. 



CONSUMPTION CURED! 

Convincing Testimony. 

Don't experiment with new and untried mixtures — you cannot 
afford it — but try at once this invaluable article. It can be 
found in any Drug Store and at most general stores. It is 
warranted to break up the most troublesome Cough in a few 
hours, if not of too long standing. It is warranted to give entire 
satisfaction in all cases of Lung and Throat difficulties. 

Kead the statement of Dr. Scovill, of Cincinnati, who is 
extensively known throughout the United States. 
J. N. HARRIS & Co. : 

Gents — This is to certify that my sister was attacked with a 
cough, to which, at first, she paid but litle attention; but, after 
a little time, it became dry and hard, and she could not expec- 
torate the phlegm. This went on, she thinking it would wear 
itself off in a short time. Finally, the lungs became sore and 
painful. The exertion to raise seemed to increase the irritation. 
She had one of the ablest physicians in the country, who attended 
her for a long time, but he gave only temporary relief. At this 
time what she raised was of a yellow and thick matter ; the cold 
chills and night sweats followed ; the system prostrated ; the 
bowels constipated ; the appetite poor; the hands and feet cold 
and clammy ; the eyes glassy, with all the attending symptoms 
of being in the last stage of consumption. Tubercles had 
formed and rotted off one of the veins, which caused hemorrhage 
of the lungs. She bled more than a pint at a time. The 
physicians, on examining her lungs, found a tubercle as large as 
a hen's egg. At this crisis, she commenced the use of the 
LUNG BALSAM, which she took freely at first, as directed, 
until she raised large quantities of phlegm. When this matter 
was once thrown off, she felt greatly relieved. As she inhaled / 
air into her lungs, it seemed to produce new life to the system. 
She now began to have hopes of getting well again. She 
bathed over the chest and back, used stimulating drinks, diet, 
and tonics, which the directions recommend. The cough rapidly 
decreased; the sores on the lungs began to heal; the appetite 
became stronger; the cold chills and night sweats stopped, and 
the strength returned, until she has entirely recovered her 
health ; and now, at this time, she is as likely to die of any 
other disease as that of Consumption. I have known this 
BALSAM to be used in many other cases, which the physicians 
and friends had given up all hopes of getting better. They 
appeared to be in the last stages of consumption. They had 
cold night sweats, attended with a diarrhoea, tubercles formed 
and ulcerated; yet they were cured, and now apparently enjoy 
good health. I have also found it to be one of the best Cough 
Medicines that I have ever used. 

Respectfully, yours, 

Dr. A. L. SCOVILL. 



Side Moo m Cookery. 



Mr. Samuel Lewis, an old esteemed resident of Cincinnati 
for many years, writes us as follows : — On the 22nd of November 
last, I sent you a statement of the great benefit that I had 
received from ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM, at which time, I was 
not altogether cured ; but now I am happy o say I have recovered 
my health. Previous to using the BALSAM, I was exceedingly 
low ; my friends thought I could not possibly get well. I would 
cough for hours at a time, and would raise large quantities of 
phlegm, mixed with corrupted matter. I would recommend all 
those afflicted with the last stages of Consumption, to give this 
BALSAM a trial. In truth, I may say it has saved my life. 



Chicken Water. 

Take half a chicken divested of all fat, and break the bones, 
add to this a half gallon of water, and boil for half an hour, season 
with salt. 



Lemon Water. 

Put two slices of lemon, thinly pared, into a. teapot, a little 
bit of the peel and a bit of sugar, pour in a pint of boiling water 
and cover it close for two hours. 



No present health can health insure 
For yet an hour to come, 

No medicine, though it oft can cure, 
Can always balk the tomb. 



Raw Egg and Milk. 

Beat a yolk very light, add it to a tumbler three-fourthsful of 
milk, beat until it foams, add sugar and flavor ; a little Port wine 
may be added if desirable. 

ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM contains no opium in any form. 
It is perfectly harmless for the most delicate child. It is every- 
where in good demand and gives good satisfaction. 



Raw Egg and Wine. 

Drop an egg in wine, and drink it without breaking the egg or 
beat the yolk, add it to the wine, beat them together, flavor to 
suit the taste. Beat the whites as light as possible, and then 
beat them through the yolk ; wine, sugar and spices, and drink 
immediately. This forms a delightful beverage, and is excellent 
to be taken when Moovering from slow fevers. 



S. & J. H. Walford, of Renfrew, Out., write, dated Feb. 28th, 
1871:— "We have sold ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM for several 
years, and have often received verbal testimonies to its efficacy in 
curing Whooping Cough and other Throat and Lungs diseases." 



James Bissel, of Chatham, Ont., writes, under date Feb. 27th, 
1871 : — "I was afflicted with a severe Cold and Cough. I tried 
various remedies without effect. I afterwards used ALLEN'S 
LUNG BALSAM, and after using two bottles I was cured. I 
would strongly recommend this Balsam to those suffering with 
severe Coughs and Colds." 

They have sharp lawyers down East. One of them, marketing 
for a dinner, asks a poultry-dealer, " Is that turkey a young 
one ?" " Yes, sir." " Will you take your oath of it ?" " Certainly 
I will." Lawyer administers the oath, charges a dollar for the 
service, and takes his pay in poultry. 



Wm. Page, of Fingal, Ont., writes, March 4th, 1871 :— "I have 
used ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM for a Cold, settled on the 
Lungs, wit& perfect success, after everything else I could get 
had failed f 

Adam Walker, of Tavistock, Ont., writes, in February, 1868, 
that after trying many Cough and Lung remedies for a severe 
cold, which he has suffered with for three years, he procured 
ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM and was being much benefitted by 
it. — In a letter still later he said his night sweats were all gone, 
and he was rapidly recovering; his appetite was much better, 
and he felt like a new man. 



A Lady, who had read of the extensive manufacture of 
odometers to tell how far a carriage had been run, said she 
wished some Connecticut genius would invent an instrument 
to tell how far husbands had been in the evening wheu they just 
step down to the post-office. 



Sick Hoom Cookery. 



Wine Whey. 

Milk-two thirds of a pint, water one-third of a pint, Madeira 
or other wine one gill, sugar one dessert spoonful. Place the 
milk and water together in a deep pan on the fire, and at the 
moment when it begins to boil pour in the wine and the sugar, 
stirring assiduously whilst it boils for twelve or fifteen minutes. 
Lastly strain through a sieve. This is excellent in all forms of 
Fever, given in small quantities. It may be drunk either cold or 
tepid, a wine-glassful at a time. 

Vinegar Whey. 

Milk one pint, vinegar one table spoonful, boil for a few 
minutes and separate the curd. 



Mustard Whey. 

Bruised mustard seed one table spoonful, milk one pint, boil 
together for a few moments and separate the curd. 

This has been found a useful drink in Dropsy, a teacupful 
may be taken at a time. 

Milk Whey. 

Steep a piece of rennet, an inch and a half square, in a teacup 
of hot water for four or five hours, then strain the water into two 
quarts of new milk : when the curd has well formed, put it 
gently in a sieve, until the whey and curd are separated. May 
be drank warm or cold. 

Nitre Whey. 

Pour into a pint of boiling milk, a table spoonful of sweet 
spirits of nitre, strain and sweeten : let it be drank warm. It is 
used to promote perspiration, and is good in cases of severe 

cold. 



That was a thoughtful economy of the Irishman in the pit of 
a Dublin theatre, who, seeing some people about to throw an 
obstreperous fellow in the gallery over the railing, and being 
much exasperated by a bad orchestra, cried out loudly : — "Don't 
waste him : kill a fiddler with him ?" 



A Comfort for Invalids. — Sometimes the sick are much 
annoyed at night by the light in the room attracting insects, 
giving an unpleasant odor, or vitiating the air of the chamber. 
Take any kind of box, remove the cover, set it up lenghthwise, 
place a lamp or candle in it, and fasten it on the outside cf the 
window so as to set close to it, with the open part looking 
through the window into the room. 



STOP THAT COUGH ! 



One week, one day, and it may be too late ! Consumption is 
waiting to number you with its many victims. 

HOI CAN YOU STOP IT ? WHERE IS THE REMEDY ? 

Allen's Lung Balsam can procure more evidence op 

REAL MERIT THAN ANY OTHER ARTICLE FOR THE PURPOSE. It IS 
SOLD EVERYWHERE RY DRUGGISTS AND GENERAL STOl/.E -KEEPERS. 



Read the following extract from a letter received from Mr. 

S. E. Burwell, a well-known merchant of Ontario : 

Messrs. Perry Davis & Son, 

Bear Sirs, — Last autumn I was suffering from a severe cold, 
which settled on my Lungs, and produced a distressing cough 
for which I gave trial to a number of Cough Medicines, but 
without any benefit. I, at last, tried one bottle of Allen's Lung 
Balsam, which, I am happy to be able to state, gave almost 
immediate relief, and performed a perfect cure in a short time. 

Yours truly, 

S. E. BURWELL. 
Fingal, Out., March 4, 1871. 



Read the following letter, from a prominent merchant of 
Marine City, Michigan : — 

Marine City, Mich., July 28, 1870. 

Dear Sirs, — The Allen's Lung Balsam has arrived. I would 
not like to be without it, for it has saved my life. I took a bad 
cold, and a cough, and linally consumption was seated upon me. 
I was in a very bad state. I tried everything that was recom- 
mended, and spent a great deal of money and got no help. I 
had the Allen's Lung Balsam for sale, but knew nothing of its 
merits. I did not like to take it without knowing more about it ; 
I had not sold a bottle. When your agent called on me I told 
him I could not sell a medicine I knew nothing about. He 
Urged me to try it myseif. I did so, and, to my great surprise, 
the first bottle stopped my cough, and before the third bottle was 
taken my lungs were healed and well, and I can now speak 
knowingly to my friends and customers of the good qualities of 
Allen's Lung Balsam. 

I remain yours respectfully, 

L. C. COTTRELL. 



Sick Room Cookery, 



MISCELLANEOUS DISHES FOR INVALIDS. 



Puddings for the Sick. 

Grate boiled flour, (see flour gruel) make a stiff paste ; add 
salt and one egg ; stir into a teacupful one pint of hot milk, little 
by little, boil it over steam half an hour, and serve with maple 
syrup or sugar and cream. Boiled mush, plain rice or milk, 
stiffened with rice flour, salted and sugared, either boiled or 
baked, are good. 

Ministers and Public {Speakers, who are so often afflicted with 
Throat Diseases, will find a sure remedy in ALLEN'S LUNG 
BALSAM. Lozenges and wafers sometimes give relief, but this 
Balsam, taken a few times, will insure a permanent cure. 



Griddle Cakes for the Sick. 

Boil pearl barley to a jelly, grate boiled flour, (see flour gruel) 
take a tablespoonful of the flour, two of the barley jelly and one 
egg ; beat well together then thin to a batter - x add salt, and 
bake. 



To make a Cream Toast for the Sick. 

Toast the bread nicely ; boil milk, add very little flour and 
salt, and strain it through a sieve on the toast. If butter is 
allowed, add a little. 



A female lecturer said : " Get married, young men, and be 
quick about it. Don't wait for the millenium for the girls to 
become angels. You'd look well beside an angel, wouldn't you, 
you blockheads ?" 



Egg and Toast for the Sick. 

Let the whites only of the egg congeal, toast a slice of bread ; 
dip it in hot water a little salted and lay on it the egg 7 season 
with salt only. 

Raisin Panada. 

Raisins, one cupful ; water one pint ; boil for fifteen minutes, 
strain, and pour the water while hot over crackers or toast, 
sweeten and add nugmeg to suit the taste, then serve — forms a 
very agreeable drink for patients recovering from severe 
sickness. 



BRONCHITIS, orJTHROAT DISEASE. 

Those afflicted will read the following. 

Zanesville, Ohio, Feb. 20, 1869. 
Messrs. J. N. Harris & Co. 

Gents, — I have been afflicted for tea or twelve years with 
Bronchitis in its worst form, and have tried everything that I 
could buy recommended, but with little or no relief, until I used 
your Allen's Lung Balsam, which gave me relief in a short 
time. I believe it is the best preparation extant for all diseases 
of the throat and lungs ; and I feel it my duty to say this much 
for my own case, so that others may try it, and get relief. 
Respectfully, 

MATTHIAS FREEMAN. 
We know Mr. Freeman well ; and his statement above is 
correct. 

W. A. GRAHAM & CO., 
Wholesale and Retail Druggists, Zanesville. 



We clip the following interesting letter from the Middlebury 
(Vt.) Register. Dr. Harris has for over twenty years been a 
respected resident of Middlebury : 

Middlebury, Vt., November 10, 1866. 
Mr. Editor : It is only to subserve the interests of humanity 
that I request a short space in your valuable paper to inform the 
public what Allen's Lung Baslam is sure to do. Two years 
ago I was attacked with a severe cold ; it settled in my throat, 
which so affected the organs of speech that I could not speak 
aloud for nearly six weeks. I got through the winter, coughing 
nights almost incessantly, with cold night sweats, with increased 
irritation which extended into the bronchial tubes, and which 
kept me coughing all summer. I was at Shoreham, on a 
professional visit, the past October, when the " Good Samaritan " 
came along, introducing Allen's Lung Balsam into New 
England. I procured a bottle and took it according to directions, 
and found immediate relief. I have now taken two bottles, 
which has entirely cured me. For the last two years, or during 
the time of my affliction, I was in a state of constipation, which 
the Balsam has most effectually regulated. No family should 
be without this valuable medicine. 

NATH. HARRIS, M. D., Dentist. 

Hours op Sleep. — The hours of sleep must be regulated by 
the constitution. An old rhyme has it : 
" Nature requires five, 
Custom gives seven: 
Laziness takes nine, 
And Wickedness eleven." 



Tapioca Cream. 

Three tablespoonsful tapioca, cover with water, and soak four 
hours, pour off the water, put one quart of milk over the fire ; 
when it boils, stir in the yolks of three eggs and a little salt, stir 
till it begins to thicken. Make a frosting of the three eggs, and 
spread over the top. Flavor with vanilla. 

Soft Custard. 

One pint milk, two eggs, half a teacupful of sugar ; add the 
sugar to the milk, and set it over the fire until it comes to a boil, 
then stir in the eggs, first beating them thoroughly ; let the 
custard remain over the fire till it thickens, constanly stirring it. 
Flavor with vanilla or almond, to suit the taste. 

Custard Pudding. 

Boil a quart of milk, beat up six eggs light, sweeten the milk 
to your taste, add the eggs, flavor it, and bake it in a pudding 
dish, or in cups, grate a little nutmeg over it. 

To make an Oatmeal Custard. 

Take two teaspoonsful of the finest Scotch oatmeal, beat it up 
into a sufficiency of cold water in a basin to allow it to run 
freely. Add to it the yolk of a fresh egg, well worked up ; have 
a pint of scalding new milk on the fire, and pour the oatmeal 
mixture into it, stirring it round Avith a spoon, so as to incorporate 
the whole. Add sugar to your taste, and throw in a glass of 
sherry to the mixture, with a little grated nutmeg. Pour it into 
a basin, and take it warm in bed. It will be found very grateful 
and soothing in cases of colds or chills. Some persons scald a 
little cinnamon in the milk they use for the occasion. 

Milk Porridge. 

Wheat flour, cornmeal, or oatmeal two tablespoonsful, milk 
one pint, water one pint, mix the flour or meal with cold water 
to form a thin paste ; put the milk and water over the fire, and 
when they come to the boiling point add the paste, carefully 
stirring ; boil half an hour or longer. 

French Milk Porridge. 

Stir some oatmeal and water together, let the mixture stand 
to clear, and pour off the water, then put more water to the 
meal, stir it well and let it stand till the next day. Strain 
through a fine sieve and boil the water, adding milk while so 
doing. The proportion of water must be small. With toast this 
is a good preparation for a weak person. 



Allen's Lung Balsam 

is composed of the active principles of roots and plants, which 
are chemically extracted, so as to retain all their medical 
qualities. 

MINISTERS AJ\*B PUBLIC SPEAKER 

who are so often afflicted with Throat Diseases, will find a sure 
remedy in this Balsam. Lozenges and wafers sometimes give 
relief, but this Balsam, taken a few times, will insure a permanent 
cure. 

Will all those afflicted with Coughs or Consumption, read 
the following and learn the value of 

ALLEN'S XjTTCTGt BA1.SAM? 



What the Doctors say : 

Amos Woolly, M. D., of Koscuisko Co., Indiana, says : — "For 
three years past I have used Allen's Lung Balsam extensively 
in my practice, and I am satisfied that there is no better 
medicine for lung diseases in use." 

Isaac K. Doran, M. D., of Logan Co., Ohio., says :— " Allen's 
Lung Balsam not only sells rapidly, but gives perfect satisfaction 
in every case within my knowledge. Having confidence in it, 
and knowing that it possesses valuable meaical properties, I 
freely use it in my daily practice and with unbounded success. 
As an expectorant it is most certainly far ahead of any 
preparation I have ever yet known." 

Nathaniel Harris, M. D., of Middlebury, Vermont, says : — 
" I have no doubt it will soon become a classical remedial agent 
for the cure of diseases of the Throat, Bronchial Tubes and the 
Lungs." 

Dr. Lloyd, of Ohio, Surgeon in the army during the war, from 
exposure, contracted Consumption. He says: — "I have no 
hesitation in stating that it was by the use of your Lung Balsam 
that I am now alive and enjoying health." 

Dr. Fletcher, of Missouri, says : — "I recommend your Balsam 
in preference to any other medicine for Coughs, and it gives 
satisfaction." 

DIRECTIONS ACCOMPANY EACH I0TTLE. 

J. N. HARRIS & CO, Sole Proprietors, 

CINCINNATI OHIO. 

PERRY DAVIS~& SON, Montreal, 

General Agents for the Dominion of Canada. 

Sold by all Druggists, and wherever this Book is distributed the 
Lung Balsam can be found at a Store in the vicinity. 



Sick Moom Cookery, 



To Cook Sago or Tapioca. 

Cleanse it in several waters and soak it in water an hour 
then boil it in water until clear ; season to suit the taste. 



Jelly of Rice or Tapioca. 

Boil until they form a mass ; pass through a sieve ; season 
to suit the taste and mould. 



Rusk of Barley or Corn. 

Brown barley or corn ; grind in the coffee mill, and eat it in 
milk. It is excellent. 



"Wine Jelly. 

Dissolve one ounce of isinglass in a half pint of water : add 
nutmeg, cinnamon, mace, cloves — a very little of each ; simmer 
gently half an hour without scorching; strain it and set it away 
to cool ; take a pint of wine, cut into it the jelly; simmer in an 
earthen ja*r until the jelly dissolves; add sugar, another pint of 
wine, warm altogether, strain and put into mould. 

Cakes for the Sick. 

Sponge cake and simple cookies are the best cakes for an 
invalid. Eich cakes should be avoided. 



Invalids' Biscuits. 

Melt three-fourths of a pound of butter in a pint of new milk, 
and pour it on three-fourths of a pound of white sugar ; when 
cool, put in half a dessert-spoonful of yeast, and a whole one of 
caraway seeds ; add flour sufficient to make it into a stiff paste 
to roll thin ; prick and cut into shapes, and bake them. 

A very nice way of making Eread. 

Take one cup of Indian meal, and two of flour ; scald with a 
pint of boiling water. When cool, add two cups of milk, one 
of yeast, and flour sufficient to mould. The more it is kneaded 
the better. When risen sufficiently, bake. 



Bice Biscuits. 

Two tablespoonsful of rice flour, three of wheaten flour, two of 
powdered sugar, a piece of butter the size of a walnut, to be 
rubbed into the flour, as much boiling milk as will scald the 
mixture. Beat with the rolling pin till short, roll out very, thin, 
and cut into rounds as large as the top of a tumbler. Bake in 
a very slow oven. 



Side Room Cookery. 



Rusks. 

Rusks and the top crusts of loaves have long been used as 
foud for children. They are recommended by Dr. Underwood, in 
his valuable work on the " Management of Infants," published 
nearly a century ago. The rusks may be bought, or may be 
made and reduced to a panada, as follows: Tear into pieces the 
crumb of a newly-baked loaf, and brown them, without burning 
in an oven. Boil in water for an hour, beat them into a fine 
pulp, then add warm milk, a little loaf sugar, and a few grains 
of salt 

Top Crust. 

The top crust of a light and well baked loaf may be prepared 
in the same manner as rusk food, by boiling in water for an 
hour and beating into a fine pulp. Mix with warm milk, and 
add a little loaf sugar, with a few grains of salt. 



Bread Panada. 

Soak a few thin slices of stale, light, and well baked bread in 
hot water, so as to form a pulp of suitable consistence. Simmer it 
gently, with some little addition of water from time to time as it 
thickens ; then add two or three tablespoonsful of warm milk, a 
little loaf sugar, and a few grains of salt. The objection to 
this bread pap, as commonly used, is, that nurses are sometimes 
apt to make it too thick. It should not be given with a spoon 
until the infant is twelve months old. 

No. 2. — Cut thin slices of bread into a basin ; cover the bread 
with cold water ; place it in an oven for two hours, to bake ; 
take it out — beat the bread up with a fork, and then slightly 
sweeten it This is an excellent food. 



No. 3. — If the above should not agree with the infant (although 
if properly made, they most always do,) grate boiled flour. (See 
flour gruel.) 



No. 4. — Another way : bake flour (biscuit-flour) in a slow oven, 
until it is of a light fawn color. This food will sometimes 
produce constipation, if so, add to the flour a little prepared 
oatmeal; or Robertson's Patent Greats; add in the proportion 
of one part oatmeal to two parts flour; one tablespoonful mixed 
with a quarter of a pint of milk or milk and water ; well boiled 
and sweetened produces a thick and nourishing food for infants 
or invalids. 



In nothing is poor Richard's proverb, " a stitch in time saves 
nine," truer than in what concerns our health, for a little timely 
care or medicine, promptly used, not only preserves or restores 
health, but often saves life. 



MEAD! READ!! HEJlD ! ! ! 

DR. PERRIN'S FUMIGATOR, 

FOR 

Catarrh, Asthma, Coughs, Colds, Sore Throat, etc. 



Neglected catarrh invariably terminates in consumption. 
The putrid secretions emanating in the head, oozing from the 
mucous lining, descend into the throat, and during sleep fill the 
stomach and lungs with decomposed and offensive secretion, 
which, by constant contact with those delicate organs so 
important to life, soon start decay and suppuration ; which 
always terminates in death. To arrest this disease in its early 
stages, and completely avert so dire a calamity, is the object of 
PERRIN'S FUMIGATOR. This remedy enjoys a reputation 
for the cure of catarrh, and diseases of the head and throat, 
leading to incipient and incurable consumption, that has com- 
manded the attention of the medical world. This remedy, in 
the form of a medicated air or vapor, penetrates every cavity, 
exerts a wonderful curative power on the mucous lining, shrinks 
up, so to speak, the membrane, and deodorizes the putrid, deadly, 
and offensive discharge, which, by being retained in the system, 
works so much mischief to the animal economy. How very- 
successful this remedy is, let the thousands it has cured speak in 
living praise of its matchless power over a disease which is the 
scourge of our whole' country. The ingredients from which it 
is manufactured embrace a class of herbs, balsams, barks, etc., 
heretofore excluded from the list of curatives, and by botanists 
considered inert and of no earthly importance. But as 
knowledge is all-powerful, and new discoveries are constantly 
being made, we rejoice that the healing of the sick and 
investigation of new and powerful medical agents march on, 
hand in hand, and we sometimes think outstrips the more 
abstruse sciences. It is enough to know, however, that in the 
discovery and use of PERRIN'S FUMIGATOR a chord was 
struck that convulsed the medical world and set gray-headed 
doctors smelling and tasting this matchless compound. Nor is 
the effect more wonderful than its mode of administration is 
novel. It is nothing to be taken inwardly. It is smoked in a 
common pipe, and by blowing the medicated fumes through the 
nostrils, this insidious remedy penetrates as if by magic the 
secret ambush of the disease, and exterminates it at once and 
forever. 

Large boxes, One Dollar ; Sample boxes, Twenty-Five cents. Sold 
by all Druggists, or will be sent by mail, free. 

Ask for Dr. HERRIOK'S Almanac at your nearest Store. 



Sick Moom Cookery. 



Bread Panada. 

White bread o>ie ounce, ground cinnamon one teaspoonful, 
water one pint, boil them until well mixed and add a little sugar 
and nutmeg. Wine or butter may also be added, if desirable. 

An old bachelor says that giving the ballot to women would 
not amount to anything practically ; because they would insist 
that they were too young to vote until they got too old to take 
any interest in politics. 



If you ever should have the misfortune to " let the cat out of 
the bag," never try and stuff her back again ; it's such a mistake ; 
you only make, inevitably make, matters forty times worse. 

Bread Panada with Wine. 

Boil equal parts of wine and water, grate bread crumbs and 
thicken the wine with them, beat constantly while boiling and 
season to suit the taste. A bread panada may be made with 
the juices of fruit and water in the place of the wine and water. 

" Are the jury agreed ? " asked the judge of a court attache 
whom he met on the stairs with a bucket in his hand. " Yes, " 
replied Patrick, "they have agreed to send out for half a gallon." 

Meat and Bread Panada. 

Mince so small that it will pass through a coarse sieve the 
white meat of a cold chicken, beef or mutton ; boil broth or 
water, season with salt and thicken with the meat, stir it 
constantly while boiling, and serve with nice toasted bread 
broken in bits. 



TO PHYSICIANS. 

Physicians having Consumptive patients, and having failed 
to cure them by their own prescriptions, if they desire to try 
ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM, by writing to the proprietors, they 
will send a formula, which will enable them to judge whether 
the ingredients are of a superior compound or not. The medical 
properties are extracted by a chemical process. The apparatus 
by which some of them are extracted cost many thousands 
of dollars. 



SYMPTOMS OF LIVER COMPLAINT. 



A sallow or yellow color of the skin, or yellowish brown 
spots on the face and other parts of the body ; dullness and 
drowsiness, with frequent headache ; bitter or bad taste in the 
mouth, dryness of the throat and internal heat; palpitation of 
the heart ; in many cases a dry, teasing cough, with sore throat ; 
unsteady appetite ; sour stomach, with a raising of the food, and 
a choking sensation in the throat, which is often attributed to 
worms ; sickness and vomiting ; distress ; heaviness or a 
bloated and full feeling about the stomach and sides, which is 
often attended with pains and tenderness ; aggravating pains in 
the sides, back or breast, and about the shoulders ; restlessness 
at night, with a tired and sore feeling of the whole body on 
rising in the morning; colic, pain and soreness through the 
bowels, with heat; constipation of the bowels, alternating with 
frequent attacks of diarrhoea ; piles; flatulence; nervousness; 
all-gone feeling ; thick, turbid, or high-colored urine ; coldness 
of the extremities ; rush of blood to the head, with symptoms of 
apoplexy ; numbness of the limbs, especially at night ; tenderness 
and fullness in right side, which often extends to the left ; cold 
chills, alternating with hot flushes ; female weakness and 
irregularities ; fainting fits, etc. 

All of the above .symptoms indicate more or less derangement 
of the liver, and are so characteristic that few can be misled. 
Of course it is not be supposed that all of the above symptoms ! 
will be found in any one case. In many instances only a very 
few of them may be manifested. 

It depends much upon the length of time the difficulty has been j 
existing, organization of the particular system affected, climate, I 
general habits, occupation, sex, etc.. etc. Of course, the longer or i 
more severe the derangement, the more numerous the symptoms or I 
external manifestations of the internal discord and complication. ! 
If nature, in her salutary struggles to relieve the blood from its j 
poisonous qualities, throws or deposits the greater portion of it 
upon the delicate organs called Lungs, there is at once more , 
or less cough as the result, with, eventually, all the Jong tram 
of symptoms of Consumption. If the bowels receive the most ' 
of the poisonous deposit, diarrhoea, dysentery, piles, bilious 
colic, etc., are the result. If the stomach receive it instead, 
dyspepsia, cholera morbus, cramps and pains in the stoma en 
sick-headache, heartburn, and many other unpleasant symptoms j 
are the result. If the poisonous bilious matter is thrown to the 
skin, all kinds of eruptions and skin diseases are quickly 
induced. 

For over a quarter of a century have HERRICKS SUGAR- 
COATED PILLS been used with remarkable success in the 
treatment of diseased liver ; and from their immense sale, and 
unsurpassed virtues as a medicine, no one afflicted with any of 
the symptoms enumerated above should fail to use them. 



Sick Koom Cookery. 



Slippery Elm Poultice. 

Stir ground slippery elm bark into hot water and let it swell. 
This is a very soothing poultice for irritable sores. 

Onion Poultice. 

Boil the proper quantity of onions till they are quite soft, 
strain off the water, mash them to a pulp, and add a little lard, 
or sweet oil to prevent them getting hard, then spread. This 
is quite stimulating and induces indolent sores to maturate 
more freely. 

Carrot Poultice. 

Boil the proper quantity of carrots till they are quite soft, 
strain off the water, mash them to a pulp, and add a little lard, 
or sweet oil to prevent them from getting hard, then spread. A 
good application for malignant and offensive sores. 

Flax Seed Poultice. 

Put boiling water in a basin, and stir in flax seed meal to 
make a thick paste, spread on linen and apply. 

SLY THOUGHTS. 

" 1 saw him kiss your cheek ! " 

<"Tis true" 
" Modesty ! " « 'Twas strictly kept : 

He thought me asleep ; at least I knew 
He thought 1 thought he thought I slept ! " 



JESSE SMITH writes, January 11th, 1866, to Mr. R. Wood, 
Druggist, at Erin, Ontario, and says : — I have been afflicted 
with bronchial affections for several years, have used various 
remedies, but they produced no good effects until I tried Allen's 
Lung Balsam, from which I derived much good. I would 
recommend its use to all parties suffering from similar troubles 
or bronchial diseases. 



Fresh Am —Give your children plenty of fresh air. Let them 
snuff it up until it sends the rosy current of life dancing joyfully 
to their temples. Air is so cheap and good, and so necessary 
withal, that every child should have free access to it. To put 
children on a short allowance of fresh air, is as foolish as it 
would have been for Noah, during the deluge, to have put his 
family on a short allowance of water. 



DR. HERRICK'S 

KID STRENGTHENING PLASTERS 

are a combination, of Vegetable Gums, Balsams, Juices, and 
Resins, with IRON, the whole formed to make a plaster that 
will be pliable, and, therefore, comfortable to wear on the person. 
One of the principal recent improvements Dr. Herrick claims 
over all other plasters is the addition of IRON, which his 
plasters, and no others, contain. It is conceded by all intelligent 
physicians that the principal vital force of the human system is 
the IRON contained in the blood. This is derived chiefly from 
the food we eat ; and if, from any cause, the necessary quantity 
of IRON is not taken into the circulation, the whole system 
suffers. This is a positive proof of the great value of IRON, and 
is the great secret of the wonderful success of Dr. Herri ck's 
Plasters in curing so many diseases, apparently unlike, by the 
simple application of a plaster on the skin, the IRON being 
taken into the system by absorption, and its magnetic influence 
and electricity developed thereby. 

First. — It is preeminently a great strengthening plaster, and 
therefore used with most certain success in all cases of 
debility, etc. 

Second.— It is not a Porous Plaster, it is a great Absorbent 
Plaster, causing a copious perspiration, which thus enables 
the innumerable pores of the skin to absorb its virtues, and by 
this means cures every kind of Pain and Aches, Acute and 
Chronic Rheumatism, Lameness and Stiffness of the Joints, 
Pains in the Side, Back, or any part of the Body, and in 
Spinal Complaints it is used with the most surpassing success ; 
and even in Curvature of the Spine it has done wonders. In 
Hip Complaints its effect has been almost magical. Liver 
Complaint, with the assistance of one or two doses of Herrick's 
Sugar-Coated Pills, it has never been known to fail in producing 
a cure. 

Third. — It is a Nervine Plaster, possessing all the wondrous 
and unparalleled virtues of IRON and its magnetic influences, 
and will, therefore, be found of surpassing value in all nervous 
complaints, such as Neuralgia, Tic Douloureux, Nervous 
Tremors, deficiency of Physical Energy, and all complaints 
arising from a derangement of the nervous system. 

Fourth. — In the combination of IRON with its other invaluable 
ingredients, it is self-evident that it must be of unrivalled benefit 
in Coughs, Colds, Asthma, Oppression of the Lungs, Weakness 
of the Chest or Back, and all those dangerous complaints that 
lead to Consumption. 

Lastly. — To Delicate Ladies, for weakness and many of 
those distressing complaints to which Females are especially 
liable, Herrick's Iron Plasters are invaluable, which will be 
evident on reflection, as no preparation or article is so necessary 
in all cases of Female Weakness as IRON. 

Herrick's Iron and Galbanum Plasters will maintain their 
virtues for years, and keep unimpaired in any climate. 



FOOD FOE INFANTS. 



In laying before our readers so large an infant's dietary to 
choose from, we beg to remind them babies require simplicity in 
food — a child a greater variety. If you find any one of the many 
articles or diet given below to agree with the babe, keep to it. 
Great care andattention should be observed on preparing any of 
these articles of diet. A babies stomach is very delicate, and 
will revolt at either ill-made or lumpy or burnt food. 

Boiled Crumbs of Bread. 

Boil the crumb of bread for two hours in water, taking 
praticular care that it does not burn ; then add only a little lump 
sugar (or brown sugar if the bowels arc costive) to make it 
palatable. When the babe is five or six months old, mix a little 
new milk — the milk of one cow — with it. Gradually, as the 
Child grows older, increase the quantity until it is nearly all 
milk, there being only enough water to boil the bread : the 
milk should be poured boiling hot on the bread. 

Prepared Rice. 

The following is a good and nourishing food for a baby : 
Soak, for an hour, some best rice in cold water : strain, and 
add fresh water to the rice ; then let it simmer, till it will pulp 
through a sieve ; put the pulp and the water in a saucepan, with 
a lump or two of sugar, and again let it simmer for a quarter 
of an hour. A portion of this should be mixed with one-third 
of fresh milk, so as to make it of the consistency of cream ; 
when the baby is five or six months old, add new milk. If a 
child's bowels are relaxed and weak or if the motions are 
offensive, the milk must be boiled. For such a child put into five 
large spoonsful of pure water one dessert spoonful of fine flour, 
rubbed smooth; set over the fire five spoonsful of new milk, 
and put two bits of sugar in it; the moment it boils pour it 
into the water and flour, and stir it over a slow fire for twenty 
minutes. Where there is much emaciation genuine arrowroot, 
made with good fresh milk, slightly sweetened, and a small 
pinch of salt, is excellent. 

Baked Crumbs of Bread. 

Crumb some bread on a plate, put it a little distance from the 
fire to dry ; when dry, rub the crumbs in a mortar, and reduce 
them to a fine powder ; then pass them through a sieve. Having 
done which, put the crumbs of bread into a slow oven to bake 
until they are of a light fawn-color. A small quantity of this 
baked crumb of bread must be made into food, in the same way 
as gruel is made, and should then be slightly sweetened with 
lump sugor. This excellent food for a child is recommended by 
Mr. Cnavasse, in his tl Advice to a Mother " 



HARVELL'S CONDITION POWDER. 



The great reputation Harwell's Horse and Cattle Powders 
have gained amongst Horsemen and Stock Raisers, warrant us 
in saying tiiat the consumer will find, upon trial, 1bat they 
contain a larger quantity of VALUABLE MEDICINE than 
there is in any other Powder offered for sale. Tweniy years 
ago, Dr. Herrick & Co. commenced manufacturing those 
Condition Powders. The satisfaction they have g ven, the 
popularity they have obtained, and the estimation in which 
they are held by stock-dealers is such that ninety thousand 
dozen are annually required to supply the market. These 
celebrated powders are a compound of vegetable remedies, so 
combined that horses and cattle love them ; and when sick 
will eat wet oats or provender, when these Powders are mixed 
with them, which they would otherwise fail to touch. 

Harvell's Condition Powder will cure all cases of 
Worms— Loss cf Appetite— All Coughs and Colds— Recent Founders- 
Horse Distemper— Hide Bound— Botts— Scurvy— Colic— Roughness 
of Hair or Coat— Stoppage of Water and Bowels— Inflammation 
of the Lungs and Bowels— Swelling of the Glands of the 
Throat— Loss of Cud— Horn Distemper— Black Tongue- 
Gripes— Gapes and Cholera in Poultry— Will backen 
the Heaves, and in recent cases effect a cure. 
Also first stages of Glanders and Farcy. 
g@f° Harvell's Condition Powder may be used successfully in 
all diseases of Horses, Cattle, Mules, Sheep, Hogs, Poultry, etc., 
by regulating the dose from a table-spoonful to a greater 
quantity, according to age, condition, and severity of the case. 



We authorize Dealers to guarantee entire satisfaction when 
given according to the directions, or the money refunded. 

B^'Herrick's Sugar-Coated Pills, Twenty- 
five Cents a Box. 

I^Herrick's Kid Strengthening Plasters, 
Twenty-five Cents. 

|@°Pemn's Fumigator, Twenty-five Cents 
and One Dollar a Box. 

g^HarvelPs Horse and Cattle Powders, 
Twenty-five Cents. 

All the above articles are put up with full and complete 
directions for use, and are sold by all Dealers in Medicine 
throughout the world. 

Address : Perry Davis & Son, 377 St. Paul Street, Montreal. 

Ask for Dr. Hemcft Almanac at yonr nearest Store. 



GOOD WOR,I>S 

FOE THE 

PAIN-KILLER 



" A medicine no family should be without." — Montreal Transcript. 
"We can confidently recommend the Pain-Killer." — Toronto 

Baptist. 
"It is the most effectual remedy we know of for Aches, Pains 

flesh wounds, &c." — St. Johns News, P. Q. 
"We advise that every family should have so effectual and 

speedy a Pain-Killer." — Amherst N. S. Gazette. 
" Our oAvn experience is that a bottle of Pain-Killer is the best 

Physician a traveller can have." — Hamilton Spectator. 

The PAIN-KILLER is used both Internally 
and Externally. 

WHEN TAKEN INTERNALLY— It relieves the most acute 
Pains instantly, affording relief and comfort to the patient 
suffering from Cramp and Pain in the Stomach, Rheumatic 
or Neuralgic Pains in any part of the system ; and in 
Bowel Complaints it is a sovereign remedy. 

WHEN USED EXTERNALLY— It is equally efficacious and 
is the best liniment in the world. 1L is eminently a 
Household Medicine. I 



ALLEN'S LUNG BALSAM 

Is warranted to break up the most troublesome Cough in an 
incredible short time. There is no remedy that can show more 
evidence of real merits than this BALSAM, for curing Con- 
SDMptioNj Coughs, ('olds, Asthma, Croup, etc. 

Physicians, having Consumptive patients, and having failed 
to cure them by their own prescriptions, should not hesitate to 
prescribe this remedy ; it has cured cases when all other remedies 
have failed. 

It is harmless to the most delicate child. 

It contains no opium in any form. 

It is sold by medicine dealers generally 

Price $1.00 per bottle. 



Purchasers of the celebrated medicines described in this 
Book will be sure and not be put off with inferior or unknown 
articles. If you cannot find ivhat you desire in one store, you will 
at another near by. Take only the genuine. 
Address all orders to 

PERRY DAVIS X SON, 

377 St. Paul Street, Montreal. 



ALLEN'S CELEBRATED LUNG BALSAM 

Cures Colds, Coughs and Consumption. 

AIsJLMN'3 CJEJLJEBMATJEJD JLUN& BALSAM 

Cures Bronchitis, Asthma and Croup. 
ALjLEW'S CMIjJEBmATED JLWNQ BAJLSAM 

Imparts Strength to the System. 
AJLJLJJN'S CJEJLJEBMATJED JLWNQ BALSAM 
Is pleasant to take. 

ALLEN'S CELEBRATED LUNG BALSAM 
Always gives satisfaction or the money will be refunded. It is 
recommended by prominent Physicians / and while it as pleasant 
to take and harmless in its nature, it is a powerful remedy for 
curing all diseases of the Lungs. Sold by all Druggists. 




PrihWd b> PUN30ET & Uf L*PTf t, "IfUMrwiT